Valencia

Valencia

Valencia (.mw-parser-output .IPA-label-small{font-size:85%}.mw-parser-output .references .IPA-label-small,.mw-parser-output .infobox .IPA-label-small,.mw-parser-output .navbox .IPA-label-small{font-size:100%}Spanish: [baˈlenθja] ⓘ, officially in Valencian: València [vaˈlensia])[a] is the capital of the province and autonomous community of the same name. It is the third-most populated municipality in Spain, with 807,693 inhabitants (2023) within the Ciudad de Valencia[1] and 1,582,387 inhabitants (2021) within metropolis of the Huerta de Valencia.[6][7] It is located in eastern Spain, on the banks of the Turia, on the east coast of the Iberian Peninsula on the Mediterranean Sea. Valencia was founded as a Roman colony in 138 BC under the name Valentia Edetanorum [es]. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Valencia became part of the Visigothic Kingdom from 546 AC and 711 AC. Islamic rule and acculturation ensued in the 8th century, together with the introduction of new irrigation systems and crops. Aragonese Christian conquest took place in 1238, and so the city became the capital of the Kingdom of Valencia. The city's population thrived in the 15th century, owing to trade with the rest of the Iberian Peninsula, Italian ports, and other Mediterranean locations, becoming one of the largest European cities by the end of the century. Already harmed by the emergence of the Atlantic World trade in detriment to Mediterranean trade in global trade networks, along with insecurity created by Barbary piracy throughout the 16th century, the city's economic activity experienced a crisis upon the expulsion of the Moriscos in 1609. The city became a major silk manufacturing centre in the 18th century. During the Spanish Civil War, the city served as the accidental seat of the Spanish Government from 1936 to 1937.[8]