Sari

Sari

A sari (sometimes also saree[1] or shari)[note 1] is a women's garment from the Indian subcontinent,[2] that consists of an un-stitched stretch of woven fabric arranged over the body as a robe, with one end attached to the waist, while the other end rests over one shoulder as a stole (shawl),[3] sometimes baring a part of the midriff.[4][5][6] It may vary from 4.1 to 8.2 metres (4.5 to 9 yards) in length,[7] and 60 to 120 centimetres (24 to 47 inches) in breadth,[8] and is a form of ethnic wear in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan. There are various names and styles of sari manufacture and draping, the most common being the Nivi style.[9][10] The sari is worn with a fitted bodice also called a choli (ravike or kuppasa in southern India, and cholo in Nepal) and a petticoat called ghagra, parkar, or ul-pavadai.[11] It remains fashionable in the Indian subcontinent today.[12] The Hindustani word sāṛī (साड़ी, ساڑھی),[13] described in Sanskrit śāṭī[14] which means 'strip of cloth'[15] and शाडी śāḍī or साडी sāḍī in Pali, ಸೀರೆ or sīre in Kannada and which evolved to sāṛī in modern Indian languages.[16] The word śāṭika is mentioned as describing women's dharmic attire in Sanskrit literature and Buddhist literature called Jatakas.[17] This could be equivalent to the modern day sari.[17] The term for female bodice, the choli evolved from ancient stanapaṭṭa.[18][19] Rajatarangini, a tenth-century literary work by Kalhana, states that the choli from the Deccan was introduced under the royal order in Kashmir.[11]