Quilmes

Quilmes

Quilmes (.mw-parser-output .IPA-label-small{font-size:85%}.mw-parser-output .references .IPA-label-small,.mw-parser-output .infobox .IPA-label-small,.mw-parser-output .navbox .IPA-label-small{font-size:100%}Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkilmes]) is a city on the coast of the Rio de la Plata, in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, on the southeast end of the Greater Buenos Aires, being some 17 km (11 mi) away from the urban centre area of Buenos Aires. The city was founded in 1666 and it is the seat of the eponymous partido. The Quilmes were a native tribe who lived in the surroundings of Tucumán. In the 17th century, after repeated attempts by the Spanish invaders to control their lands, the Quilmes were defeated and were forced to settle in a restricted colony (reducción) near Buenos Aires, where the authorities could control them. The settlement was thus established in 1666 as Exaltación de la Santa Cruz de los Kilme. The 1,000 km (621 mi) journey from Tucumán was made on foot, causing hundreds of Quilmes to die in the process. The colony had been abandoned by 1810 and had become a ghost town. The land was divided in parcels and the town of Quilmes was established in 1818, which would later flourish during the wave of immigration in late 19th-century Argentina.[2] During the first British invasion, lasting 46 days in 1806, the British arrived from Montevideo through Quilmes and went to Buenos Aires from there before being defeated and expelled.