Chester

Chester

Chester is a cathedral city and the county town of Cheshire, England, on the River Dee, close to the England-Wales border. With a built up area population of 92,760 in 2021,[1] it is the most populous settlement of Cheshire West and Chester (which had a population of 357,150 in 2021).[5] It is also the historic county town of Cheshire and the second-largest settlement in Cheshire after Warrington. Chester was founded in 79 AD as a "castrum" or Roman fort with the name Deva Victrix during the reign of Emperor Vespasian. One of the main army camps in Roman Britain, Deva later became a major civilian settlement. In 689, King Γ†thelred of Mercia founded the Minster Church of West Mercia, which later became Chester's first cathedral, and the Angles extended and strengthened the walls to protect the city against the Danes. Chester was one of the last cities in England to fall to the Normans, and William the Conqueror ordered the construction of a castle to dominate the town and the nearby Welsh border. Chester was granted city status in 1541.